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Photographer
I currently use a Canon 1D Mark III DSLR for my camera body. Much more important than the total number of pixels is the camera image quality. This is especially relevant at the higher ISO settings you often must use in nature photography. Many of the most dynamic images are shot at first light or late in the day. I usually shoot during mid-morning hours when the best light's available. Slightly overcast light is some of the best as well, with a soft even exposure the result.<br />
 I use a very sharp Canon 300mm f/2.8 image stabilized prime lens coupled with 1.4x and 2x extenders if needed. For insects I rely on a Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens. I sometimes use the Canon 300mm plus 1.4x setup for butterfly flight shots, because of the distance from subject that's needed. To attract insects for macro we have built multiple raised garden beds. For very close work I use the Sigma 150mm with a Sigma EM-140 DG ringflash. If you are going to be shooting in your backyard, you need to make the habitat wildlife friendly of course. I started by building a small pond with waterfall that replaces the ponds volume every 24-48 hours. This was done by running a waterline to the pond, with a small stream run-off. The stream runs slightly downhill and has created a small marshy area profuse with cattails and other natural grasses. It has become a breeding ground for amphibians, dragonflies and other assorted fauna. This has provided me even more photo opportunities without ever leaving my home. Just the sound of the waterfall attracts small migrating warblers throughout the year. I use multiple feeders placed near my desired shooting "zones". This lets me fill the frame and compose the image as I shoot. I also use what are called "props". For example, I employ small moveable potted trees or ornamental shrubs. Or a small branch mounted over the ponds waterfall where the warblers drink. Your imagination's the limit..

I currently use a Canon 1D Mark III DSLR for my camera body. Much more important than the total number of pixels is the camera image quality. This is especially relevant at the higher ISO settings you often must use in nature photography. Many of the most dynamic images are shot at first light or late in the day. I usually shoot during mid-morning hours when the best light's available. Slightly overcast light is some of the best as well, with a soft even exposure the result.
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